Tag Archives: VP Corner

VP’s Corner

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VP’s Corner Jeff Fuller WB6UJE As many of you are already aware, the May meeting will be our last one at the current location.  NOVEC, who had been kind enough to lend us their conference room, needs to reclaim that space for use as a computer training lab.  I was able to reserve the Community Room at the Manassas Central Library for our June and July meetings. It’s located at 8601 Mathis Avenue, not too far from NOVEC.  Meeting time will be 7-8:30 pm based on available reservation slots. June & July Club Meeting Location The library is a good short term fix, but for a variety of reasons won’t work long term. Ray and I are busy knocking on doors of Prince William County public conference rooms, schools, churches, and a number of other organizations in search of a new… Read more »

VP’s Corner

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VP’s Corner Jeff Fuller WB6UJE One of the more interesting things I’ve seen during my return journey to ham radio has been the marriage of the microprocessor and the radio.  It started with frequency synthesizers.  Easy to net everybody up on one frequency and no more drifting VFOs. And them came digital modes. All those nifty error correcting codes I studied years ago in school were once limited to pencil and paper exercises, or maybe a mainframe lab or two. Now they run on a laptop computer sound card, like the one I used last month in a transatlantic QSO running five watts of PSK31. And, ham radio has joined the Internet of Things (IoT) – a variety of unmanned systems and sensors for monitoring and reporting. Want to learn more about IoT ? Are you an Arduino programmer, Skywarn… Read more »

VP’s Corner – Jeff Fuller WB6UIE

I’m honored to have been elected OVH’s Vice President and I look forward to working with you and the other officers and directors in club activities and in the recruiting of new members. Like many of us, my interest in ham radio began when I was a youngster. In my case, that was over fifty years ago in junior high school. After passing our Novice exams which included a 5 wpm Morse code test, a couple of us pooled our very limited funds and managed to buy a World War II surplus ARC-5 receiver and enough parts to assemble a power supply and a 6L6 (vacuum tube) crystal oscillator. The total cost for these items was probably under $20 but that was a lot of money back then. I can still remember the smell of the solder melting as we carefully added each component. Antenna? Well, that was sort of a long wire –… Read more »